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We check in with people at each stage of the cash transfer process to see how things are going. Take a look at some of their stories as they appear here in real-time. Learn more about how recipients opt in to share their stories.
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Newsfeed > Wiliter's Profile
Wiliter's family
Wiliter
landscapeCountry:
kenya
workOccupation:
Subsistence farming
faceAge:
46
workCampaign
Standard Kenya
There will be no further updates from this completed recipient.
2nd Payment
Transfer Amount
53150 KES ($530 USD)
access_time 2 months ago
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How is your life different than it would have been if you never received the transfer?
My life is now different in that we used to live in a small hut which wasn't enough to accommodate my family. My children were at risk of getting burnt during the cold evening as they would converge at fireplace which is also cooking area. Through the money which I received, I managed to build a semi-permanent house which is much spacious. We now live happily in our new house. I also bought a cow which gives us milk and through that I have now cut my daily expense as I would spend much money buying milk for use before. I have been able to save more money which I can spend on other needs for the family. I believe were it not through GiveDirectly I wouldn't have managed to build a house and buy a cow. Everyday I always pray to God to bless GiveDirectly.
In your opinion, what does GiveDirectly do well, and what does it not do well?
In my opinion, GiveDirectly is doing so well in that they give recipients the power to chose on what they spent on depending on their needs. Unlike other donations, which they sponsor specific projects which may not best fit the needs of everyone in the selected group. Again there is no partiality during enrollment as individuals from selected villages are given an opportunity to voluntarily decide to participate in the programme thus transparency. It's my feeling that GD should come back to our village and check on the great difference which they brought in our village through this unconditional transfer.
What did you spend your second transfer on?
The second transfer which I received from GiveDirectly I spent part of it on purchasing building materials for completing a house which I had constructed halfway with my first transfer. I also spent part of it to buy two sacks of maize for consumption since we had poor harvest the previous year. We didn't have a cow and I bought one at KES 20000. The remaining amount I spent to buy clothing for my children, husband and myself.
 
Initial Payment
Transfer Amount
55000 KES ($543 USD)
access_time 4 months ago
attach_money
 
Describe the biggest difference in your daily life.
Before Gd came to my village, I had always feared welcoming someone to my home since I knew that they would have to sleep at my neighbor's house like my children. I am now happy and I can comfortably welcome anyone to my house at any time since I know that they will have a comfortable place to sleep. Owning a bigger house is the most precious thing that has ever happened to me unlike where we were living in a smaller house which could not host all of my family members
Describe the moment when you received your money. How did you feel?
It was around 8 am when I received my transfers. At that instant, I became so happy and since I was not at home, I decided to leave my brother's house on that same day and headed directly home so that my husband and I could plan on how to use them. Since I was extremely happy, I called my spouse while on my way to inform him about the good news since I could not wait any longer before breaking the news to him.
What did you spend your first transfer on?
I have been living in a one-room house which usually acts as a kitchen, bedroom and living room for my family. Culturally, my husband and I cannot sleep with our children in the same room since they are now grown-ups. This has always made them sleep at my neighbor's house and I have not been comfortable with it because of their security. When I received my first transfers, I saw the need of building a bigger house which can accommodate my all family members. Almost everyone in our region had already planted their farms except my family and a few others. This prompted me to use part of the money to buy maize seeds, fertilizers and in paying a tractor to till my farm so that I would also be a bar with others. I spent part of the remaining amount of-of money to buy food for my family and to pay school fees for my children since only three weeks were remaining before the school opens and I had no money to use in paying their school fees
 
Enrolled
access_time 6 months ago
 
What does receiving this money mean to you?
I have been aspiring to own my cow since we have been buying milk for Ksh 60 a litre yet we normally use 2 litres a day which is expensive. Therefore, receiving this money mean I will be able to own a cow.
What is the happiest part of your day?
My normal day starts by waking up at 6.00am and prepare my children for School who leaves at around 7.00am. After which I start my normal household chores such as fetching firewood and water, washing utensils and at times I am forced to do any other casual work within the neighborhood such as digging other people's farms. It is only at the evening that I feel relieved after my husband is back from his casual work where he normally comes with food. This therefore, makes my evening the happiest part of my day.
What is the biggest hardship you've faced in your life?
The biggest hardship I have faced in life is lack of enough money to buy food and pay School fees. I have five School going children and all are in Primary School where I pay around Ksh 5,000 a year. As a house wife, I solely depend on my husband's wages which is hardly enough for our household consumption and meet education expenses. My husband normally does a casual work such as working on other people's farms like digging, fencing, among other small jobs which he earns between Ksh 400 to Ksh 500 a day.