chat
GDLive Newsfeed
We check in with people at each stage of the cash transfer process to see how things are going. Take a look at some of their stories as they appear here in real-time. Learn more about how recipients opt in to share their stories.
Stages:
 
Enrollment
attach_money
 
Transfers
check
Completed
to follow someone and stay updated on their journey with GiveDirectly.

Want to hear more updates from recipients? Click below to follow 10!

Newsfeed > Kahonzi's Profile
Kahonzi's family
Kahonzi
landscapeCountry:
kenya
workOccupation:
Casual labour
faceAge:
52
workCampaign
Standard Kenya
Upcoming Stage
Next Payment
check
 
Follow to be updated on Kahonzi's next check-in.
 
Initial Payment
Transfer Amount
55000 KES ($548 USD)
access_time 1 month ago
attach_money
 
Describe the biggest difference in your daily life.
My son has not in school for a period because I had not cleared his school fees arrears and on receiving the transfer, I took him back to school and paid a portion of the fees and now he is going on with his studies without any hindrance.
Describe the moment when you received your money. How did you feel?
I was away from my phone for some hours for it was off by then. At around 11oclock, I turned on my phone and the message loaded. As I went through them, I came across a notification from GiveDirectly and on checking to confirm its contents, It came to my realization that I had received my first transfer from them. I was happy to see the promise has finally been fulfilled. I was thankful to God to GiveDirectly for support through the finances.
What did you spend your first transfer on?
I spent part of my first transfer to buy a pair of oxen and ox-plough. My farming was not very much efficient since I was using farm tools that were tiresome and I could not till my whole acreage and I could seek for help from my neighbours to hire their oxen which was very expensive. On receiving the transfer, then I had to buy my own so as to utilise my arable land fully for better yields and timely preparations and for early cultivation and planting. My son was not attending his studies and was sent home due to the huge fees arrears that he owed the school. I took a percentage of the transfer to pay for his school fees and now he is happily in school continuing with his studies. I also purchased some iron sheets to build a small house which will be accommodating my children for they have been seeking shelter from my neighbours for my house was not enough to have all of us in one house. I did some shopping to meet some basic needs for my family and for their welfare.
 
Enrolled
access_time 5 months ago
 
What does receiving this money mean to you?
The economic activity that I solely depend on is subsistence farming. However, this is not able to sustain my family of four members because the land is not so productive. Besides this I also sell the local brew, 'mnazi' and burn charcoal which is against the law. I have to do it because I need to get extra income to educate and feed my children. My desire has always been to educate my children, but due to financial constraints I have not been able to see them through secondary school. Therefore, I will use this transfer to purchase goats for rearing. Once they multiply I will sell them in Bamba market. I will also buy oxen and ox plough that I will use to plough my land and in other people's farms. Lastly I will start a hotel business next to Mwakwala primary school. This will enable me to have a stable income to cater for my family's needs such as education, food and clothing.
What is the happiest part of your day?
I spend the whole day in the bushes cutting down trees and uprooting trumps to burn charcoal. This is a very tiresome job that wears me out and I am not even sure of getting income by the end of the day. However, in the evening when I am done with my work I rest in order to regain energy for another day. I also sit with my children and plan for our future and this makes evening the happiest part of my day.
What is the biggest hardship you've faced in your life?
My husband died thirteen years ago and left me with five children. I took the responsibility of raising my children singlehandedly through casual jobs that earn me at least one dollar a day. The lack of a sustainable source of income has made it difficult for me to educate my children. Four of them had to drop out of primary school and they now work as casual labourers.